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UPS Warns A Possible Strike As Teamsters Eye Coming Vote

Posted by Land Link on Nov 7, 2018 6:20:34 PM

The Teamsters union is threatening a strike over the terms of this years contract. As of October 25, the Teamsters National Freight Negotiating committee has received its last best offer from UPS freight. Voting on the contract will be happening throughout this week starting November 7. The previous contract was rejected on October 5th. There is a 30-day extension of the current contract which will expire on November 12th. The negotiating committee demanded:

1) tighter restrictions and limits on subcontracting and rail usage;
2) higher wage increases that are not split;
3) earning protection for city drivers when they perform dock work;
4) elimination of the new qualifiers for pension and vacation benefits; and
5) a week’s worth of vacation pay for all classifications based on 1/52 of the prior year’s earnings.

The negotiating committee has determined that the LBFO does not sufficiently address the issues raised by the members. Nevertheless, because of the company’s insistence that there is no more money to be had and in order to allow its members to make an informed decision on a question that will affect them and their family, the negotiating committee decided to submit the LBFO for acceptance or rejection. a strike has already been authorized. While a strike is a last resort, if the members reject this final offer from the company there will be no other options and there will be a strike at a time and location(s) determined by the negotiating committee.

The Repercussions of A UPS Strike

Two decades ago, 187,000 employees at UPS walked off the job for 16 days. As of Wednesday, the company’s union workers, now numbering 260,000, are threatening to do so again. The walkout on Aug. 4, 1997, led to hundreds of millions of dollars in losses for UPS. It was, at the time, one of the biggest nationwide strikes the country had ever seen. It was a different time, though. The strike impacted consumers differently than it would today since business owners saw the most direct effects, often unable to restock shelves. The consequences of a strike today may be much more severe than that of 20 years ago. The online community, from both a seller and purchaser viewpoint, will be dramatically affected. When we think online retailing we have to think about Amazon. They will be the barometer for the effects of a UPS strike on the economy and international commerce.

Amazon’s tight relationship with UPS is supplemented by one with the U.S. Postal Service. Should UPS be unable to deliver customer packages, it’s possible the retailer will lean heavier on the USPS. Trump, though, is no fan of that relationship, attacking Amazon in a series of tweets earlier this year, saying the company wasn’t paying enough to ship packages. Experts have disputed this position, saying Amazon and other online retailers have helped stanch the post office’s declining cash flow. Still, a weakened Amazon could bring another round of Trump attacks. Or, worse, inaction.

President Bill Clinton refused to stop the 1997 strike, even though he did have the legal power to do so under the Taft-Hartley Act. But Labor Secretary Alexis Herman strongly urged the two sides to stay at the negotiating table for 80 hours of talks in a five-day period. That pressure is credited as one of the reasons the strike didn’t last long. The LTL Strike of 1994 Crippled interstate commerce for weeks. I was a seasoned Transportation manager during the strike of 94. It involved the teamster drivers employed by some 20 plus common carries. LTL comprises the bulk of freight shipments domestically so the impact was huge. There was a mad scramble to consolidate shipments by carriers nationwide who were not experienced in consolidating small LTL shipments; typically 2-4 pallets. Equipment availability was severely impacted as was delivery schedules and rates. It was a bad time for shippers as they had to look toward truckload and expedited carriers to get their freight delivered. To make matters worse, the mid 90's began the JIT ( Just In Time )inventory system. Simply defined, It was a cost-saving measure to reduce inventory carrying costs started by the automotive industry. It was an effective business philosophy but relied heavily on tightly defined pickup and delivery windows. The significantly devastating downside of such a philosophy is definitely any type of work stoppage.

How Do Protect Your Business From A UPS Strike

It is not likely to happen but fortune smiles on those prepared. Asset availability is going to be the biggest issue. Given the timeframe of the potential threat, there is no time to go through the steps to get set up with additional providers. This is a time when an established 3PL can offer valuable alternatives quickly. In the event of a strike, contact Land Link Traffic Services to help your business get your product delivered. Visit us today www.Land-Link.com.

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Topics: Industry Trends, Technology, Shipping News

Managing Supply Chain Risk

Posted by Land Link on Sep 26, 2018 5:02:38 PM

There's always a little risk involved in any decision. That's where the fun, and profit, begin. The trick, of course, is when, how much and how dangerous. When do you take the risk, what is your level of commitment and what is the downside? Taking and managing risk in today's supply chain market is simply the cost of doing business in a competitive market. Knowing how to manage that risk is becoming increasingly important. 

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Topics: Industry Trends, Technology, Shipping News

Next Gen Supply Chain: Look to the Cloud

Posted by Land Link on Sep 6, 2018 4:31:33 PM

Wrapping up our technology series we're going to take a look at cloud computing and how it integrates all the supply chain technologies we've been discussing. Cloud computing has been around for a while but growing in popularity and integration. All data will eventually reside in the cloud. Let’s be sure we understand what the cloud is. The cloud refers to software and services that run on the Internet, instead of locally on your computer. Most cloud services can be accessed through a Web browser like Firefox or Google Chrome, and some companies offer dedicated mobile apps. No longer will you load programs on your computer from a CD. The advantage of the cloud is that you can access your information on any device with an Internet connection. It’s what allows you to make edits to various files on your home computer, and then continue where you left off from the office or wherever. The cloud also makes collaboration on the same document possible among several viewers.

Next Gen Supply Chain and the Cloud

Of all the NextGen supply chain technologies, the cloud will be integral. Blockchain, IOT, AI and the digital supply chain will all require cloud computing. In fact some say that the cloud will be the most impactful NextGen technology in the supply chain for the foreseeable future based entirely on its use as a backbone of data interchanges. Industry analysts suggest Amazon’s newfound profitability and efficiency to the effectiveness of its cloud services. In the supply chain application, basically, the cloud centralizes data and offers multiple entities access to that data, decreasing costs and speeding supply chain velocity while adding data security. As with any shared data system, there are security concerns to address. That's where our blockchain technology is implemented. We add is some Internet of Things technology in case we want to share data with other machines and some Artificial Intelligence to teach the machines how to execute their operations more efficiently each time. There is another fundamental shift in the supply chain, and elsewhere for that matter, fueling cloud adoption. Quite simply, companies are starting to treat data as an asset. Furthermore, the value of data only increases as it is accessible across enterprises. As the value of that data increases the responsibility of Transportation companies will increase as we will be among those sharing the data. Logistics professionals will need to reinforce their internal data security network to ensure data integrity or face possibly significant financial liability. While most will agree that we aren’t there yet, the direction is clear. Look to the cloud.

Integration Means Advantage

Companies that take advantage of the latest technology and trends made possible by the cloud will be better positioned to adopt newer technologies that are on the horizon. By staying on the leading edge of technology adoption, you'll level the playing field with larger competitors and be poised for success moving into 2018. This is as true with Logistics companies as with any other service provider. Make the commitment this year to be ready to implement these technologies in 2018. You won't need them all. For more information subscribe to our blog or contact us today at www.land-link.com.

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Topics: Logistics News, Technology

Technologies Reshaping the Global Digital Supply Chain

Posted by Land Link on Aug 29, 2018 11:13:02 AM

In our ongoing technology series, we have concentrated on the Informational and analytical innovation applications which are reshaping supply chain technology as we know it. Namely Blockchain technology, IoT, ( The Internet of Things ), supply chain digitization and 3-D printing. These technologies are the breakthrough software applications which are fueling supporting technologies, some of which we're going to explore today. So let's examine some of the applications that are more hardware based like drones, driver-less vehicles, robotics, smart glasses and augmented reality.

Drone Delivery

Drone delivery offers some significant promise in final mile delivery challenges in particular. But it is not without its' hurdles. Refer back to our March 8th blog post for a quick review. Today, these physical innovations do not yet have a clear business case for large-scale rollout. Nevertheless, hosts of companies are experimenting with them to understand their potential and how their business can change for the better when these technologies are successfully adopted. Drone delivery is hampered by distance and weight limitations, as well as security and delivery confirmation challenges. That being said, drone delivery, with an adequate reception system can have a significant effect on improving final mile delivery and reducing the associated costs. As e-commerce continues to advance, the need for a more viable solution to the problem of delivery in heavily congested and confined urban areas is of global importance. It is estimated that 5 billion people will live in urban areas by 2030. As a result, last mile delivery will become increasingly difficult in urban areas across many global locations.

Driver-less Vehicles

The hurdles for driver-less trucking have mainly dealt with public acceptance and legal issues pertaining to the transition to driver-less trucks. While technology and innovation move at a swift pace, indeed regulatory and infrastructure changes will lag a few years behind.
We may still be a long way away from a future where trucks and ships will be controlled by artificial intelligence (AI) alone. But even so, preparing for a future that is more reliant upon autonomous vehicles should remain a priority for corporations that employ vast fleets across multiple geographic regions. Failure to plan for this eventual inevitability would be a mistake for players in the logistics industry. Driver-less technology will not replace the truck driver. It is expected to ease the driver shortage by increasing the efficiency of the existing driver fleet and improve overall driver safety.

Robotics In The Supply Chain

Just like drone and driver-less technologies robotics applications are limited in their scope of use. Limitations aside; autonomous robots are already bringing innovation to the supply chain and delivering significant value, chiefly because they can help:

• Improve speed and accuracy of routine operations, particularly in warehousing and manufacturing.
• Add efficiency through side-by-side work with humans.
• Reduce the risk of employee injury in dangerous environments.

In addition to these benefits, robotics is a source of reliable labor, high quality, virtually mistake-free, job performance and significant cost savings over humans. With robotic mobility improvements and AI, advancements robotics is expected to play a significant role in the future of global supply chain logistics.

Smart Glasses in the Warehouse

The benefits of smart glasses applications extend beyond the manufacturing plant floor and into virtually any hands-on task within the enterprise. Now, a growing number of distribution centers are beginning to roll out smart glass pilots in their warehouses. Thus far, the most popular logistics application is “vision picking,” whereby visual cues and directions for order fulfillment are projected into the user’s field of view. By receiving hands-free, digital information, warehouse workers can eliminate the need for RFID/laser barcode scanners and paper documents to be more productive. DHL recently completed a pilot program utilizing smart glasses yielding impressive results. The smart glasses provide visual displays of order picking instructions along with information on where items are located and where they need to be placed on a cart, freeing pickers' hands of paper instructions and allowing them to work more efficiently and comfortably. The international trials have shown an average improvement of productivity by 15 percent and higher accuracy rates. The user-friendly and intuitive solution has also halved on-boarding and training times.

Augmented Reality

Before we begin to discuss AR lets try to understand it. Augmented reality is the integration of digital information with the user's environment in real time. Unlike virtual reality, which creates a totally artificial environment, augmented reality uses the existing environment and overlays new information on top of it. Everyone knows the yellow first down line that would appear on our television sets during NFL games. That is an example of augmented reality. Adding computer-generated content to a background that is real. The applications in Logistics and transportation are real as well. Warehouse employees typically perform multiple actions when managing an order. They must locate the correct product, scan it, and deliver it to the loading dock. However, emerging computer vision and machine learning solutions can identify where a product is located and whether it is the correct product at a much faster pace than could otherwise be achieved by a human. If used correctly, such technology has the potential to significantly reduce the cost of warehousing operations.

To stay informed on these cutting-edge technologies subscribe to our blog www.Land-Link.com. As always, we welcome any chance to address your specific logistics questions with you.

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Topics: Industry Trends, Technology, Logistics News

3-D Printing. What Is It And How Will It Affect Supply Chain Logistics?

Posted by Land Link on Aug 22, 2018 3:39:59 PM

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Topics: Industry Trends, Technology, 3D Printing

The Digital Supply Chain Defined

Posted by Land Link on Aug 15, 2018 4:25:36 PM

This article is yet another dose of enlightenment on our technology series to keep our clients informed on the pace and direction of supply chain industry standards. Previously we have discussed the importance and applications of Blockchain technologies and IoT (the Internet of Things) in logistics and supply chain management. These technologies are transforming the way we do business. To stay up to date and competitive we must stay informed. The issue is most of this stuff is so new and so dynamically changing that keeping up is a challenge for most of us from the old school way we’ve been managing transportation for decades. We have some catching up to do in a hurry.

Digital Supply Chain Defined

I always insist my readers have a firm understanding of our discussion topic. To that end; A Digital Supply chain is defined as A digital supply chain is a supply chain whose foundation is built on Web-enabled capabilities. Many supply chains use a mix of paper-based and IT-enabled processes. A true digital supply chain goes far beyond this hybrid model to fully capitalize on connectivity, system integration and the information-producing capabilities of "smart" components.

Digital Supply Chain 101

Ultimately, virtually every aspect of business will be transformed through the vertical integration of research and development, manufacturing, marketing and sales, and other internal operations, and new business models based on today’s advances. In effect, we are evolving toward the complete digital ecosystem. If you recall from our blogs on Blockchain technology and IoT. The common thread of these and other emerging technologies in the web-based component which allows for inter-connectivity and sharing of real-time information. The days of fax transitions and telephone calls are all but extinct. Email may survive but will likely be phased out in favor of peer to peer communication. Peer to peer communication is a direct connection between users operating on a shared platform bypassing the delay of email or analog communication.

What To Expect

So, the race is on. Companies across industries are already investing heavily to develop their own versions of the DSC. According to a recent PwC study on the rise of Industry 4.0, a third of the more than 2,000 respondents say their companies have started to digitize their supply chains, and fully 72 percent expect to have done so five years from now.

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Topics: Industry Trends, Big Data, Technology

IoT Technology in the Supply Chain and Logistics

Posted by Land Link on Aug 8, 2018 12:53:59 PM

In keeping with our Supply Chain Technology series, we want to discuss in this article the applications and benefits of IoT technology in the supply chain and logistics functions. So, let's begin with a firm understanding of what the "Internet of Things" is. 

Let's start with understanding a few things:

High speed, broadband internet has become the standard, the cost of connecting is decreasing, more devices are being created with Wi-Fi capabilities and sensors built into them, technology costs are going down, and smartphone penetration is sky-rocketing. All these things are creating a "perfect storm" for the IoT. Simply put, IoT is the concept of basically connecting any device to the Internet. Devices can also be interconnected to communicate with each other via the internet. This includes everything from cell phones, coffee makers, washing machines, headphones, lamps, wearable devices and almost anything else you can think of. This also applies to components of machines, for example, a jet engine of an airplane or the drill of an oil rig. If it has an on and off switch, then chances are it can be a part of the IoT. The analyst firm Gartner says that by 2020 there will be over 26 billion connected devices, some even estimate this number to be much higher, over 100 billion. The IoT is a giant network of connected "things," things in this explanation include people. The relationship will be between people-people, people-things, and things-things. In the very near future, you will have to think of little more than setting your alarm clock. After that, all your devices will know to start the coffee, preheat the oven, turn on CNN for the morning financial news...whatever we used to do manually will all be done for us through IoT. The reality is that the IoT allows for virtually endless opportunities and connections to take place, many of which we can't even think of or fully understand the impact of today.

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Topics: Industry Trends, Technology, Supply Chain Management

Blockchain Technology is Poised to Transform Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Posted by Land Link on Aug 2, 2018 1:52:04 PM

We've been talking a lot about emerging technologies like Blockchain, IOT, (The Internet of Things) and a worldwide digital supply chain. Change is coming, and it's best we prepare. So, in a several part series, we're going to delve deeper into these technologies to explain the technology and offer some real-world applications in logistics and supply chain management. We'll start the first part of our series by taking a close look at Blockchain Technology.

What Is a Blockchain

The blockchain is a breakthrough technology that is expected to alter most industries in the coming years. Whether you work in the financial world, healthcare or any other sector, you will probably face the consequences yourself soon enough. But what is this thing you’re going to face? The technology has been the driving force behind the Bitcoin craze. It is precisely the authenticity aspect of the technology that is most valuable and provided validity and auditable confirmation to the valid value of products like Bitcoin. It gives investors a comfort level, perhaps to a degree like never.

So, in layman's terms lets look at an international shipment as an example to demonstrate the blockchain application. The blockchain is a distributed database existing on multiple computers at the same time. By "distributed" it means that all parties have access to the shipment details of our example shipment. To understand what a block is, in our example, it may be the origination documentation, customs forms, bill of lading, etc. The "Blockchain" is constantly growing as new sets of recordings, or ‘blocks,’ are added to it. So, again using our example, the next block might contain details on the sailing date, cargo vessel, and container ID. Each block includes specific information, a timestamp and a link to the previous block, so they form a chain. So, you might imagine the next "block" would contain details of the destination port, offloading time and warehouse location. The next block would likely include information on the cartage agent, truck number, driver ID, etc. And finally, the last block would contain details on the final delivery including proof of delivery signatures and time stamps. The heightened level of security and impervious nature of the technology to fraud is what blockchain offers to transactional business like ours and just about every other industry. The database is not managed by anybody; instead, everyone in the network gets a copy of the whole database. Old blocks are preserved forever, and new blocks are added to the ledger irreversibly, making it impossible to manipulate by faking documents, transactions, and other information. So, blockchain is independent, transparent, and secure. The advantages of such a distributed ledger are apparent: being it cost and risk reduction, data security, or transactions transparency, companies from most industries can surely benefit from this new technology.

So now that we have a clear understanding of blockchain technology let's examine some Logistics and Supply Chain applications that are emerging today.

Shipping and Receiving Functions

Cargo companies across the world, especially those that support international delivery, recognize the benefits of the blockchain technology. The technology can allow the company to track each item while simplifying the existing logistics process. Maersk, the world’s biggest operator of shipping containers, has already experimented with blockchain. They along with Dutch Customs and US Department of Homeland Security used the technology to keep tabs on the movement of their cargo across international borders. Maersk has now teamed up with IBM to develop highly secure logistic systems that will alter the global trade landscape for good.

The system is expected to save billions of dollars for companies engaged in freight transportation by replacing existing logistic processes. It will help to reduce errors, improve delivery times and enable detection of fraud while lowering costs incurred.

Invoice Paperwork and Payments

A significant challenge in logistics is developing efficient and secure systems for invoicing and payments. For decades shippers have extended payment terms by insisting on receiving original proof of delivery receipts for example. Blockchain will eliminate the need for such documentation. Tallysticks has developed a platform, launching in September, based on blockchain that can handle invoicing and payments for logistic and other businesses. Based on smart contracts, it automatically sanctions a payment corresponding to an invoice. Visa has also jumped on the blockchain bandwagon and has launched its B2B Connect payment service. It aims to simplify payments across international borders while ensuring security and transparency. It also provides that a system that prevents frauds and minimizes errors is in place without involving a middleman.

Inventory Tracking

Blockchain technology can be used to build an efficient system that allows different companies to keep track of their products even at micro levels. Multiple food retailing companies have partnered with IBM to develop a system based on blockchain that allows tracking of food items. The alliance includes Walmart, Nestle, and Unilever to name a few. The technology will enable the company to backtrack individual food items back to the farm. Walmart has successfully experimented twice with the blockchain. It tracked pork in China and mangoes in Mexico to their origins. This accurate tracking ability is of importance in recall situations threatening public health.

How will tracking a fruit or meat product be useful? Roll back to the E. coli outbreak in the U.S. ten years ago wherein spinach infected with the microorganism spread the disease. If a similar incident occurs in the future, it will be easy to identify the infected batches of the commodity. There will be no need to destroy the whole stock, only the infected ones. Time is of the essence for managing such incidents and limiting the damage to both the public health and the corporations brand value.

To stay informed on the emerging technologies that are affecting our industry register to receive our weekly blog. For specific information on how your company can benefit from these emerging technologies contact one of our Logistics professionals today www.Land-Link.com.

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Topics: Technology, Logistics News, Supply Chain Management

Safety Tips for The Holiday Weekend

Posted by Land Link on Jun 26, 2018 1:19:01 PM

We thought we might take a break from our usual industry topics to draw attention to a serious issue; driver safety, particularly, over the holiday weekend. Transportation analysts expect a record number of people in the U.S. to travel during the Independence Day weekend. The travel group AAA says almost 45 million Americans will take trips to destinations at least 50 miles from home during the holiday period. Unfortunately, reported road rage incidents are on the rise. The increase in holiday traffic can only add to driver frustration. Do what you must to keep your patience in check this holiday for the sake and safety of your family as well as other travelers. Be cognizant of the stopping distances required by a fully loaded semi-truck.  A fully loaded semi-truck has a gross vehicle weight, depending on its cargo, of up to 80,000 lbs. Compare this to the average loaded weight of a passenger vehicle of 4,000 lbs, and you can see the difference in energy produced by both vehicles.

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Topics: Industry Trends, Technology, Transportation News

The Coming Evolution of Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Posted by Land Link on May 3, 2018 4:55:02 PM

The transportation and logistics industry are currently going through some major transformations. The current metamorphosis is creating opportunities as well as challenges. Successful shippers are looking for ways to adjust to the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities. The economy, labor, and I believe, most dramatic, is the technology component which will be the game changer. Astonishingly what seemed like an unrealistic idea ten years ago, today, is now plausible because of technology. From robotics to radio frequency identification technology to blockchain applications, the possibilities are intriguing to say the least. The challenge for supply chain professionals is how to stay current on these applications and how they can give your business the competitive edge that often makes the difference between black and red on the financial statements. Let's cover a few key areas in which every supply chain professional should have a firm understanding.

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Topics: Logistics News, Supply Chain Management, Industry Trends, Technology